Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

  • where:

    Guyana, South America

  • what:

    Tropical Rainforest, Hiking

  • why:

    Beauty, Waterfall, Wildlife

  • when:

    Year Round

  • Geotag Icon Show on map

We left Shanklands eco-resort and traveled up the Essequibo river by boat. We arrived at an incredibly small airstrip. Our boat captain dropped us off and then sped away. One thing about traveling in Guyana is that the people are not very forth coming with information on itineraries. Although we had no problems, being dropped off at a jungle airstrip where the only structure is basically a bus stop with a windsock on top can be a little disconcerting. We waited a little while until an incredibly small plane arrived.

The pilot got out, threw our bags in a tiny compartment, made sure we were settled and then strapped himself in. The prop plane could not fit more than eight people. We flew fairly low, about 500 feet above the treetops. The view of the rainforest was amazing. However, I didn’t spend much time taking it in because I was very airsick.

Finally, Kaietur falls came into view. The river looked like a deep scar cutting though the forest. Even though we were looking down, the falls still looked quite tall.

After we landed, we hiked toward the falls though the rainforest. Along the way we had to squeeze though some rock formations. When the trail opened up a little we observed some carnivorous plants and frogs that were peppered throughout the rainforest.

There was one frog in particular that lives it’s life in the bromeliad. The Golden Frog was used by medicine to lower the metabolic processes of people so that they would appear dead. When a tribes person would bring a sick relative to the medicine man, he would give them the extract from the frog and say the person had died. Then he got together the whole tribe to perform a ritual to bring the person back to life. When the person awoke the tribes would believe the medicine man had the power to give life. The person was still sick though.

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy MilksWe were able to get a glimpse of the falls from several viewpoints. But, the last view was the most impressive.

We came to a clearing and we were right in front of the top of the falls. There were no guardrails so we walked right up the river. Since the water level was low, we went out as far as we could and looked around. There were no rapids and the light mist was the only indication that there was a seven hundred foot drop a few feet away.

We enjoyed the beauty of the falls for quite some time and then hiked back. Unfortunately, this was the end of our tip and we boarded the plane.

At that time, we did not know that we could arrange to stay overnight at the falls. I think that we would have enjoyed an overnight stay since our quick trip didn’t give us enough time to explore the rainforest.

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Kaieteur Falls

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Kaieteur Falls

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Kaieteur Falls

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Kaieteur Falls

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Golden Frog

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Kaieteur Falls

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Airport

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Airstrip near Kaieteur Falls

Photography by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Amazon Rain Forest