• where:

    Guyana, South America

  • what:

    Tropical Rainforest, Unspoiled Nature

  • why:

    Beauty, Exploration, Wildlife

  • when:

    Year Round

  • Geotag Icon Show on map

We left our hotel in Georgetown and traveled though the city by cab. The drive was very surreal. We saw cows standing next to pumps at a gas station. We crossed the worlds longest floating bridge, which seemed to be metal plates not joined together in any particular way, held up by various floating debris. At one point we drove along the dykes that separate the ocean from the city. Apparently the Dutch only like to make settlements below sea level. We also saw farmers drying their rice on the shoulder of the road.

After about forty-five minutes, we arrived at the pier. We had to go through a security gate with razor wire trimming the top. The pier looked like it had seen better days. Random boat-related items were strewn about and we could see a few half-sunken boats in between ones that were floating in the shallow river water.

We waited for a half an hour then our boat driver picked us up and we headed up the Essequibo River. The banks of the river were home to trading towns that brought their goods out of the surrounding Amazon. The river was quite calm and much wider than I expected. Still, we were sprayed with mist from the river because of our speed. It took a full hour to reach Shanklands. When we reach their pier, our boat captain dropped us off and sped away. We walked up the stairs and we were shown to our house.

Our house was a beautiful Dutch colonial style house with the trademark cookie cutter details. We had a large, fully equiped kitchen and bath. There was a bug net around the bed so you could sleep comfortably with all of the large windows open. On the patio, there was a hammock that we used for many naps.

Bottles of ginger ale were in an ice chest in the kitchen. The ginger ale in these bottles were the best I had ever tasted. Our three daily meals were wonderful as well.

We went hiking through the rainforest on some of the near by trails. The rainforest was humid and the canopy prevented the sun from hitting the ground. Since we are city folk, everything looked alike and it was easy for us to loose our sense of direction.

On the property, you can visit the bus that the owner used to live in prior to building the eco-resort. Once a home, it is now a metal shell that the forest is slowly consuming.

One day, we took a guided tour down though a near by village. Our guide’s wife taught at the school and he was kind enough to introduce us to the class. We also met a few of the villagers and saw an old, abandoned army base.

There was a small beach down by the river, where we would watch the sun set while sitting on the pier listening to the lazy river.

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Essequibo River

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Bear

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Village near Shanklands resort

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Village near Shanklands resort

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Essequibo River

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Essequibo River

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Essequibo River

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Shanklands

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

The first settlement at Shanklands resort

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Shanklands

Photographs by Eric Scott and Marcy Milks

Shanklands