Photograph by Eric Scott

  • where:

    Escalante, Utah

  • what:

    Unspoiled nature, Beauty

  • why:

    Hiking, Nature, Contemplation

  • when:

    Year Round

  • Geotag Icon Show on map

Coyote Gulch can be accessed from the Red Well trail head 31.5 miles down Hole in the Rock Road. Which is located a few miles southeast from Escalante Utah. There are a few links at the end of the article with more detailed instructions and maps.

I have written a few articles about backpacking in the Southwestern United States now, and have praised all, but Coyote Gulch maintains a special significance for me. It was the first backpacking trip I undertook solo, which in our current society is completely foreign to most. Surrounded on all sides by people at all times, even when alone most seek out an electronic voice or image of a person. Even those that read, still live with another’s thoughts in their head. So when I had committed myself to the trip waves of apprehension began to pervade into my consciousness. I feared death, injury, boredom, but most of all I feared that I lacked confidence. The most curious thing to me was that my decision seemed to scare others even more than myself. It was if I had disregarded an understood rule among human kind. Don’t step beyond the abilities and courage of those around you. This may seem like a platitude, but it was the first time I really understood the significance of the defeatist attitude that has become so pervasive in a large portion of the American population.

Photograph by Eric ScottDespite the many warnings and horror stories, I did it anyway. I could describe the scenery, but the pictures in the article will do a much better job of that, besides the most significant part of any trip, is taking yourself outside the realm of what you know already, and in that respect Coyote Gulch gave me a perspective on life that I will value until my death. I spent three days in the canyon with no form of entertainment and no one to talk to. I was never bored and everything I did seemed to have value, and most of all it showed me that nothing has to be hard, a decision has to be made and then acted upon, nothing else. One of my favorite quotes from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, and this may not be exact, is “I try everything. I accomplish what I can.”

On a side note, if you decide to keep you camera in pouch on your waist belt, make sure you close it. On the second day I did a eight-mile round trip hike from Jacob Hamblin Arch to the confluence of the Escalante River. About three miles from my base camp on my return I decided to take a shower in a waterfall and rest. I was deleting some of my bad pics on my camera and apparently didn’t completely close the pouch it was in. When I got back to camp I realized my camera was gone. So I started retracing my steps running back along the trail. I found the camera in the river about two miles from my camp, I hadn’t refilled my water so by the time I returned to camp I was a little dehydrated and spent the night with a headache. Although the camera didn’t survive, luckily the pictures did.

Usefull Resources:

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch near the confluence with the Pariah River

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Jacob Hamblin Arch, Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Jacob Hamblin Arch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch

Photograph by Eric Scott

Coyote Gulch